Case Study – Georgia

Case Study – Georgia

Authors: Tata Chanturidze, Charity Jensen

Georgia is a small (population around 3.72 Million, 2016) lower-middle income country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia, with the life expectancy at birth of 73 (2016), and GNI per capita, PPP of $3,810.  Georgia was selected as a case study for “why when and how” countries learn from each other due to three reasons. First, the country has pursued broad system wide reforms since the collapse of Soviet Union, moving from low income to lower-middle income and shortly upper-middle income (in 2015 only) status in the past two decades.  Second, it has made significant progress against the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Third, it pursued extensive health sector reforms, some closely resembling developments in the region, but others being almost unique and sometimes quite radical.

We chose the “health financing reforms” and “hospital privatisation reforms” as the units of analysis. The rationale behind the choice was that Georgia broadly applied internationally approved approaches to the health financing reforms, while defining the own pathway for hospital privatisation.